OurPhilosophy

Emergent Curriculum

Emergent Curriculum is a way of teaching and learning that requires teachers to observe and listen to the children. Teachers ask questions and listen for the children’s ideas, hypotheses and theories. After observing children in action, the teachers compare, discuss, and interpret their observations. Teachers plan activities, studies and long term projects in the classroom based on their observations. Teachers partner with children and the exchange of theories are referred to as the Cycle of Inquiry. Teachers use their interpretations, intentions and goals (social, emotional and academic) to make choices that they share with children. Learning is seen not as a linear process but as a spiraling progression


The Role of the Teacher
The image of the child shapes the role of the teacher and involves four major components. Teachers are:
Co-constructors: partners, guides, nurtures, solves problems, learns, hypothesizes
Researchers: learns, observes, revisits
Documenters: listens, records, displays, revisits
Advocates for children: involved in the community, politics relating to children, speaks for children and presents work to other educators and community members.  Projects

Projects provide the backbone of the children’s and teachers’ learning experiences. They are based on the strong convictions that learning by doing is of great importance and that to discuss in group and to revisit ideas and experiences is the premier way of learning. Project ideas come from experiences of the children and teachers, a chance event or problem posed. They can last from a few days to several months.



Image of the child

​Children are viewed as competent, curious, full of knowledge, potential, and interested in connecting to the world around them. Teachers are deeply aware of children’s potentials and construct all of their work and environment of the children’s experience to respond appropriately.